Did you know we have a mobile site?

Skip Ribbon Commands Skip to main content
My Access Login
Advanced Search
Leadership Lauded for Farm Bill
Bookmark and Share

Agricultural Leaders of Michigan today thanked Senator Debbie Stabenow, Chairwoman of the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry, and Senator Pat Roberts, the ranking minority member on the committee, for their leadership in gaining the yes votes of an historic 90 Senators to proceed with consideration of the Agriculture Reform, Food and Jobs Act of 2012 (the Farm Bill).


Source: Agricultural Leaders of Michigan

Sen. Stabenow and Sen. Roberts lauded for leadership on Farm Bill


Agricultural Leaders of Michigan today thanked Senator Debbie Stabenow, Chairwoman of the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry, and Senator Pat Roberts, the ranking minority member on the committee, for their leadership in gaining the yes votes of an historic 90 Senators to proceed with consideration of the Agriculture Reform, Food and Jobs Act of 2012 (the Farm Bill). The proposal, authored by Sens. Stabenow and Roberts, protects programs essential to agriculture, family farms, rural development, conservation and jobs.

“Sens. Stabenow and Roberts have achieved an unprecedented milestone in bipartisanship with their work on the 2012 Farm Bill,” said Jim Byrum, president of the Michigan Agri-Business Association. “Ninety Senators came together in a bipartisan manner and voted to move forward. This sends a clear signal to the House to get to work so we can get a Farm Bill passed by the end of September, when the old program expires.”

The Farm Bill strengthens key programs that help farmers reach new markets and create jobs here in Michigan. At the same time, this bill contains real reforms to food and agricultural policy that save billions of taxpayer dollars and consolidate programs. The bill reforms food and agricultural policy by eliminating direct payments and emphasizing the need to strengthen risk management tools for farmers, saving billions of dollars. Overall, the 2012 Farm Bill will reduce the deficit by $23 billion.

For more than a year, ALM worked closely with Stabenow on key issues affecting Michigan’s agriculture economy, including:

  • Strengthening crop insurance and expanding access so farmers are not wiped out by a few days of bad weather.
  • Consolidating two remaining farm programs into one, which will give farmers the ability to tailor risk management coverage – meaning better protection against real risks beyond a farmer’s control.
  • Eliminating direct payments, meaning farmers will no longer be paid for crops they are not growing, will not be paid for acres that are not actually planted, and will not receive support absent a drop in price or yields. Growing bio-based manufacturing.
  • Extending rural development initiatives to help rural communities upgrade infrastructure and encourage small businesses to grow.

The Farm Bill also eliminates duplicative programs, allowing funds to go to areas in which they will have the greatest impact and work better for producers. For example, the bill consolidates 23 existing conservation programs into 13 programs, while maintaining the existing tools farmers and landowners need to protect and conserve land, water and wildlife.

CONTACTS:

    • Dave Armstrong, President and CEO of GreenStone Farm Credit Services:
      (517) 318-2290
    • Ken Nobis, President of the Michigan Milk Producers Association:
      (248) 474-6672
    • George House, Executive Director of Michigan Allied Poultry Industries Inc.:
      (616) 676-5593
    • Ben Kudwa, Legislative Director of the Potato Growers of Michigan:
      (517) 669-8377
    • Sam Hines, Executive Vice President, Michigan Pork Producers Association:
      (517) 853-3782
    • Jim Byrum, President of the Michigan Agri-Business Association:
      (517) 336-0223
    • Jeff Sandborn, President, Michigan Corn Growers Association:
      (517) 204-3591