Did you know we have a mobile site?

Skip Ribbon Commands Skip to main content
My Access Login
Advanced Search
2010 Michigan Soybean Performance Report
Bookmark and Share

The Michigan Soybean Performance Report is an excellent resource for comparing the yields, standibilty, maturity and white mold tolerance of soybean varieties across multiple locations and years. The Michigan Soybean Performance Report lists the oil and protein contents of all the varieties entered in the performance trials.


Source: Michigan State University, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources

Contact: Eileen Gianiodis 517-432-1555, ext. 230

2010 Michigan Soybean Performance Report Updated and Available

EAST LANSING, Mich. – Selecting the best adapted soybean varieties for a farm is one of the most profitable decisions producers will make.

According to Mike Staton, Michigan State University Extension (MSUE) soybean educator, growers should use several resources to make that decision.

To ensure that they are selecting the best adapted and highest yielding varieties for their farms, producers should utilize the following sources of information:

  • the Michigan Soybean Performance Report
  • seed suppliers
  • their own on-farm variety trials and comparisons
  • local MSU Extension variety trials (if available)

"If you are not utilizing any one of these sources of information, you are reducing the probability that you are selecting the best adapted and highest yielding varieties," Staton said. "Most soybean agronomists agree that evaluating variety performance data from as many different environments (locations and years) as possible is essential to selecting top performing varieties."

The Michigan Soybean Performance Report is an excellent resource for comparing the yields, standibilty, maturity and white mold tolerance of soybean varieties across multiple locations and years. The Michigan Soybean Performance Report lists the oil and protein contents of all the varieties entered in the performance trials.

Soybean quality (oil and protein content) is becoming an important issue to Michigan soybean producers as China, the largest importer of soybeans, is demanding soybeans that contain at least 19 percent oil and 35 percent protein on a 13 percent moisture basis.

"Michigan is widely recognized along with Indiana and Ohio for delivering high protein soybeans to international buyers. However, we struggle to consistently produce soybeans containing 19 percent oil," Staton said. "Variety selection is the most reliable way to increase the oil content of your soybean crop so this information should be considered when identifying potential varieties for 2011."

The report is updated annually, and the 2010 report is available now from local MSU Extension offices or online at http://www.css.msu.edu/varietytrials.  An online searchable version of the report will also be available after December 1, 2010 at http://www.soybeanyielddata.msu.edu.

 

                                                            #eg#