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MMPA Approves Feral Swine Resolution
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Wildlife experts estimate up to 5,000 feral swine are loose in Michigan. Feral swine are offspring of imported non-native Eurasian and Russian boar and razorbacks that likely escaped from Michigan hunt clubs. They are destructive to crops and property, and are known vectors of diseases that can harm other livestock, including dairy cows.


Source: Michigan Milk Producers Association

MMPA Urges Feral Swine Order to go in Effect

Delegates at Michigan Milk Producers Association’s State Annual Meeting last week overwhelmingly approved a resolution in support of a state order declaring feral swine an invasive species. 

“Feral swine are a great risk to Michigan’s vibrant, growing dairy industry,” said Ken Nobis, president of the Michigan Milk Producers Association. “The diseases feral swine are known to carry, particularly bovine tuberculosis, are a serious threat to Michigan’s dairy industry. A tremendous amount of resources and time has been spent to control and eradicate bovine tuberculosis. It makes no sense to put the livelihoods of 2,000 dairy farm families and tens of thousands of local jobs in jeopardy by trying to regulate feral swine.”

The dairy industry is Michigan’s largest agriculture commodity, generating $6 billion in economic activity in the state and employing more than 26,500 people.

The following resolution was unanimously adopted by MMPA delegates at the State Annual Delegate Meeting on March 15, 2011:

“Many farmers and rural residents are very concerned about the increasing population of feral hogs and other destructive wild animals. We need to have every tool or means available to help control these animals. We strongly support the order signed by former Department of Natural Resources and Environment Director Rebecca Humphries that declares wild hogs an invasive species effective July 8, 2011. We urge that the order go into effect without delay.”

Wildlife experts estimate up to 5,000 feral swine are loose in Michigan. Feral swine are offspring of imported non-native Eurasian and Russian boar and razorbacks that likely escaped from Michigan hunt clubs. They are destructive to crops and property, and are known vectors of diseases that can harm other livestock, including dairy cows.

“Allowing the state order to go into effect is the right thing to do to help protect Michigan’s growing dairy and agriculture industry,” Nobis said. “Feral swine simply cannot be regulated. They must be banned and eradicated before it is too late, and they harm Michigan’s agricultural economy.”

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Michigan Milk Producers Association, is a milk marketing cooperative owned by approximately 2,100 dairy farmer members throughout Michigan, Indiana, Ohio and Wisconsin. For more information, contact MMPA’s Member Relations Department, P.O. Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376 or call (248) 474-6672.