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MSPC Reminds Farmers to Comply with 2014 Farm Bill
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The Michigan Soybean Promotion Committee (MSPC) reminds farmers that, in order to be eligible for premium support on federal crop insurance, a certification form must be on file with the Farm Service Agency (FSA).


Source: Michigan Soybean Promotion Committee

Contact: Gail Frahm, gfrahm@michigansoybean.org

Michigan Soybean Promotion Committee Reminds Farmers to Comply with Conservation Requirements of 2014 Farm Bill


The Michigan Soybean Promotion Committee (MSPC) reminds farmers that, in order to be eligible for premium support on federal crop insurance, a certification form must be on file with the Farm Service Agency (FSA). Since the 1985 Farm Bill, eligibility for most farm programs has been linked to conservation compliance. The 2014 Farm Bill links conservation compliance with the premium subsidy paid by the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation.

If you plan to participate in crop insurance and have not filed a conservation compliance form, you need to do so by June 1, according to Christine White, Michigan FSA’s state executive director. If you have not filed the form or do not file it by June 1, you may still purchase crop insurance, “but you’ll be ineligible for the premium subsidy for crop year 2016, which runs from July 1, 2015 to June 30, 2016,” White says.

The form, known as AD-1026, can be found at www.fsa.usda.gov. “Farmers can print off a form from the Internet,” says White. But, she adds, “because they probably are not familiar with our terminology, at the very least, they should call the local FSA office and walk through it with them on the phone,” to avoid having it sent back. She suggests that farmers simply stop by their local Farm Service Agency office, and may want to call ahead of time.

When you file your form, she says, FSA will let you know if there are any existing highly erodible land or wetland determinations on your land, and whether the Natural Resources Conservation Service needs to make any evaluations. If you are subject to the conservation provisions for the first time because of the 2014 Farm Bill, you’ll get priority for assistance in developing and applying a conservation plan or in making a wetland determination.

Gail Frahm, executive director of MSPC, says, “If farmers don’t file the conservation compliance form, they could lose the subsidized premium of their crop insurance.” According to Joe Shultz, agriculture aide to Senator Debbie Stabenow, “Senator Stabenow’s office feels there are nearly 500 farms that haven’t yet been signed up on this form,” she added.

“Most farmers already have the form on file because it’s required for participation in most USDA programs,” according to Frahm. “If you are uncertain whether you have previously filed the form, contact your local FSA office,” she says.
Highly erodible land conservation and wetland conservation provisions aim to reduce soil loss on erosion-prone lands and to protect wetlands for the many benefits they provide. The provisions apply to all land that’s considered highly erodible or a wetland, and that’s owned or farmed by people voluntarily participating in USDA programs.
The Risk Management Agency, through the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, manages the federal crop insurance program that provides the modern farm safety net for American farmers and ranchers.
A listing of USDA service center locations is available at offices.usda.gov.