Did you know we have a mobile site?

Skip Ribbon Commands Skip to main content
My Access Login
Advanced Search
Healthy Transplants Leads to a “Michigan Fresh” Garden
Bookmark and Share

Selecting healthy transplants can help give a good start to a productive and attractive garden. Learn tips that you can use to choose the best transplants for your location from Michigan State University (MSU) Extension’s “Michigan Fresh” program.


Source: Michigan State University, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources

Contact: Laura Probyn at 517-432-1555, ext. 228

 

Selecting Healthy Transplants Leads to a “Michigan Fresh” Garden


Selecting healthy transplants can help give a good start to a productive and attractive garden. Learn tips that you can use to choose the best transplants for your location from Michigan State University (MSU) Extension’s “Michigan Fresh” program.

Using the best transplants provides more reliable plant establishment, fewer pest problems and decreases the time until you reap a bountiful garden harvest. According to the Michigan Fresh fact sheet titled “Healthy Transplants” (MSU Extension bulletin E3175), knowing what diseases are usually present in a garden can help decrease disease in that garden. Many vegetables and ornamental plants are resistant to disease, so gardeners can plant vegetables or ornamentals resistant to diseases they are expecting in their garden to reduce diseases in a garden.

“Buying your plants from an established greenhouse grower or garden center is a good place to start,” says Mary Wilson, MSU Extension educator. “It’s generally a safe assumption a company that has been doing business for many years has managed to stay in business by providing a quality product.”

Selecting healthy plants is also a key consideration, Wilson adds. Plant stems, roots and leaves should all be in good health to be transplanted. Choose stout plants with deep, green leaves. Stems should show no signs of lesions or discolorations. Plants with white, fibrous roots are ideal. Roots should not be tangled. A healthy plants fact sheet is available at the MSU Extension Bookstore.

Look for Michigan Fresh fact sheets every week during the growing season at Michigan farmers markets. Each fact sheet will include information on varieties, storage, food safety and preservation of Michigan-grown fruits, vegetables, flowers and ornamentals. Fact sheets will be available online and at select farmers markets across Michigan.

Michigan Fresh is an educational program from Michigan State University (MSU) Extension. The program helps people explore the state’s bounty of fresh, locally grown fruits, vegetables, flowers and ornamentals. To learn more, visit http://msue.anr.msu.edu/programs/mi_fresh/.