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Starting Seeds Indoors Provides Large Benefits
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Starting seeds indoors allows home gardeners to begin growing plants with low tolerance of cold without losing any yield to frost.


Source: Michigan State University, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources

Contact: Laura Probyn at 517-432-1555, ext. 228

 

Starting Seeds Indoors Provides Large Benefits for “Michigan Fresh” Gardeners


Home gardeners can get a head start on growing gardens that will make them the envy of their neighbors by starting seeds indoors before the growing season gets underway. The Michigan State University (MSU) Extension staff members who are contributing to the “Michigan Fresh” campaign have compiled information about starting seeds that will lead to a lush garden and bountiful harvest. Look for a fact sheet at your area farmers market beginning May 12.

According to the Michigan Fresh fact sheet titled “Starting Seeds” (MSU Extension bulletin E3176), starting seeds indoors is especially beneficial in Michigan for plants with low or no tolerance to cold and frost. Predicting when there is no danger of frost can be a difficult task with Michigan’s variable spring weather. Starting seeds indoors allows home gardeners to begin growing plants with low tolerance of cold without losing any yield to frost.

Selecting the proper container for starting seeds will allow the seeds to flourish throughout the growing process and save work when transferring seedlings outdoors. Containers should be clean, sturdy and fit in an area with access to sunlight. A variety of trays, flats and pots are available at retailers that will serve as ample containers for starting seeds indoors. A starting seeds fact sheet is available at the MSU Extension Bookstore.

Every week this summer, Michigan Fresh fact sheets will feature information on varieties, storage, food safety and preservation for Michigan-grown fruits, vegetables, flowers and ornamentals. The fact sheets will be available online and at select farmers markets across Michigan.

Michigan Fresh is an educational program from MSU Extension. The program helps people explore the state’s bounty of fresh, locally grown fruits, vegetables, flowers and ornamentals. To learn more, visit http://msue.anr.msu.edu/programs/mi_fresh/.